H.T. Sundance: Whore for Dictionaries

You might be interested to know (though I’m sure you couldn’t care less), that I’m not the biggest book lover. Writing? Absolutely. However besides some childhood sagas (not Harry Potter or Twilight, mind you) and a mess of Star Wars novels, I’m not a big reader. I would like to be, but I find that my interest is hard to keep when it comes to literature. Perhaps time and a greater grasp of patience will change that.

When it comes to dictionaries, however, I’m a bit of a collector. Thesauruses also. My father constantly gripes about the space they take up, but upon my infrequent excursions of treasure hunting (garage sales and such), I just cannot pass up a dictionary or thesaurus if I see it. While I could look up anything on the net, there’s something different about holding a hive of words and phrases in your hands. The smell of crumbling bindings, the vague sepia stains of the aged pages. The older it is, the more I want it. The collection continues to grow.

My newest acquisition on the right.

Today I picked up The Modern Dictionary For Home – School – Office by the Funk & Wagnalls Company from 1941. It’s in awful condition, but I don’t mind too much. For $2 it’s hard to complain. The most interesting thing about antiquated dictionaries is the use of terms and spellings that you simply don’t see in dictionaries today. While strolling into a public place and crying out “Alack-!” will probably earn you a few odd looks, adapting terms seldom heard in modern life into poetry is never a bad idea (for example: alarum, an archaic, poetic variation of alarm). Remember, your vocabulary can never be too large!

Anyone else have a book fetish of their own? Drop a comment in the box! In the meantime, I’ll be taking up more space with musty old tomes of archaic wordplay.

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About HT Sundance

I'm 20 years old and I'm a writing student living in Hawaii. Writing is my passion, and I'm striving to break into the market doing something I really love.

Posted on December 17, 2011, in Flimflam and tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. Interesting… dictionaries. You’re unique.

  2. I love the idea of collecting vintage dictionaries. And my personal opinions is the more you read, the better you can write and know the tools, but obviously you’re doing just fine. :)

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